Towards Verrazano Bridge Tank shall go.

Besides being a full time anime fan I am an avid cyclist as well, I can’t use my bicycle to commute to and from work, I’d really like to but I can’t. So I just enjoy taking a free ride in Brooklyn and on Manhattan.
For quite some time I was thinking of doing a photo report of a cycling route that I favor most.
For the whole week weather was absolutely marvelous just right for a late autumn ride along New York Bay. I ride on Brooklyn side on a promenade along the shore line. Usually it’s a out-and-back trip towards 69th street pier. But today I decided to make a bit of a loop around Bensonhurst, Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights and New Utrecht districts of Brooklyn.

Trip begins next to a local shopping plaza.



Continues along coast line towards Verazano bridge.

Heh, funny comment, indeed.

There are info boards all along the promenade. This and neighboring ones lists different species that habit Bay waters.

Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, opened in 1964, connects Brooklyn with Staten Island. It is second largest bridge in US, after Golden Gates Bridge in San Francisco. Spans across New York Bay for 4,260 feet (1,298 m).

“Work horse” of mine – Trek 820 mountain bike. Pretty good when riding on beaten tarmac and off-road, but a bit heavy.

Getting closer to the bridge, on the right – Belt Parkway, a highway that goes along Brooklyn’s coast line.

Mid-way through. Bloke is actually meditating there.

Close-ups of Verrazano bridge. An engineering marvel it is, indeed.

Passed Verrazano Bridge and going further around the banking.

Promenade turns into an alley with separate lanes for bicyclists, roller skaters and pedestrians. Tarmac gets better as well ride from here isn’t that bumpy.

Some more aquatic fauna.

And another info-board. Now about who eats who in basin.

I consider this board a bit incorrect, the bloke with a fishing pole should be drawn sitting on the toilet. Why? Because you most certainly will get diarrhea or a bad case of cramps after eating a fish caught in this waters.

Further away we go.

From this point I can get a glimpse of Manhattan’s lower side and high rise buildings in Jersey City.

Another info-board, this one about various ships that you can encounter sailing New York bay.

Final stretch towards 69th Street Veterans Memorial Pier.

On the right – gates to a water pollution control plant.

Pier itself. Quite popular place among Brooklynites (habitants of Brooklyn call themselves such). Several small festivals are conducted there during summer time.

Pigeons are frequent guests there as well. Now it’s quite chilly outside so they all ruffled up.

And a second after some bloke threw bred crumbs on the ground.

Veteran’s Memorial stands in the center of the pier.

It is a popular fishing spot as well. But I shall not risk eating a fish caught there.

Great view opens on Manhattan’s sky scrapers and lower side. A bit to the left there’s Liberty Island With Statue of Liberty on it.

Bayonne cargo terminal in New Jersey.

Ferry terminal on Staten Island. Those orange vessels go between Staten Island and Manhattan. Never rode it but sometime definitely will.

Left the pier and now I’m on 69th street.

Most common building in Brooklyn are exactly like those on the right. We call them brown stone or row-houses. Some of them built over, you won’t believe, a hundred ears ago, still standing strong.

Peculiar thing about the molding that goes along the rooftop. It’s made of cast iron, I checked myself. Stupid isn’t it? What a waste of metal, wouldn’t it be easier and cheaper to make them out of some kind of concrete or plaster? Well, no. Initially those houses were planned and built without any moldings whatsoever, ad looked awfully horrid. So, government decided to brighten the look up a bit with moldings and columns. Cast iron moldings are cheaper and faster to produce in large quantities, and so much easier to attach.

Tokyo neighborhoods are well known for the cable, telephone and electrical communications stretched between poles and houses. I do remember myself being captivated by Makoto Shinkai’s artwork, portraying poles, electrical transformers, and a webbing of wires with bright blue sky as a background. Terrific vistas those are, indeed.

We have these in Brooklyn as well, not that vivid, though. On the contrary, most of Manhattan’s communications are underground.

One of the numerous bagel places. This one is located on 65th street like the title.

Everything bagel with cream cheese is my favorite. What’s your favorite bagel, if you have those in that back of beyond of yours?

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